Current Theses

Title

Student

Supervisor

Description

Performance Effects of GPU Buffer Indexing Methods in Structured Grid Applications Julian Stecher Philipp Gschwandtner Details
Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Hydrodynamics: Redesigning Cronos Joshua Ocker Philipp Gschwandtner Details

 

Title Performance Effects of GPU Buffer Indexing Methods in Structured Grid Applications
Student Julian Stecher
Language German or English
Supervisor Philipp Gschwandtner
Description Accelerated clusters are ubiquitous, with 7 of the top 10 fastest supercomputers world wide supported by accelerators of some form (9 of the top 10 on the Green500 list). A key aspect of this technology is the fact that their computing and memory architecture differs from that of the host in which they are installed. This bachelor thesis focuses on implementing and benchmarking multiple variants of structured grid proxy apps for several dimensions in CUDA and investigating relevant performance effects.
Tasks
  • porting of 1D, 2D and 3D stencil codes to CUDA
  • investigating 4D data structures on top of 3D buffers
  • exploring usability and performance tradeoffs among various methods of allocating and indexing into CUDA buffers
  • performance evaluation accross multiple Nvidia GPU models
Theoretical Skills parallel programming, high performance computing, GPU computing, performance analysis
Practical Skills C++, CUDA, working with GPUs
Additional Information

Title Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Hydrodynamics: Redesigning Cronos
Student Joshua Ocker
Language German or English
Supervisor Philipp Gschwandtner
Description High performance computing is a branch of computer science that evolves very quickly, with increasingly complex architectures in both software and hardware.
However, HPC application software is often developed by domain scientists, who may struggle to keep up with these innovations. Cronos is such an example, a structured grid simulation capable of computing gamma ray emissions of binary star systems. With development started over a decade ago, its programming style reflects various language standards of C++ and lacks modern features such as accelerator support or adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The idea of AMR is to drastically reduce the computational work of a grid based simulation, by dynamically adjusting local resolution.The goal of this bachelor thesis is to provide a preliminary prototype for a new Cronos implementation that supports AMR and can be easily extended to contemporary programming models.
Tasks
  • Code analysis of original Cronos implementation
  • Redesigning a minimal working prototype with a strong focus on sustainable software
  • Evaluation of basic AMR support
  • Performance evaluation
Theoretical Skills parallel programming, high performance computing, scientific computing
Practical Skills C++, working with legacy code bases, scientific computing
Additional Information

If a bachelor student wants to set his/her initial/final presentation he/she (or the supervisor) MUST contact Sashko Ristov to schedule the presentation!

Details for the theses